Free Hotline (+44) 0800 931 3333
Free online P&P, all day, everyday
Every further order is free of postage for you today.



Ametrine is a true natural wonder, combining two beautiful quartz varieties in an impressive gemstone.

Naming of Ametrine

The term “ametrine“ is composed of “amethyst“ and “citrine“ and refers to the two gems that come together in the ametrine.

Chemical composition of ametrine

In mineral terms, citrine and amethyst combine in the ametrine to form an enchanting unit. Both gemstones belong to the quartz mineral family; From the iron deposits within (different value iron) the quartz crystal lattice, this combination arises.

Origin of Ametrine

Ametrine, which is suitable for processing to gemstone jewellery, can unfortunately currently only be mined in one single area.

The Anahi Mine is located in the La Gaiba area of Santa Cruz, Bolivia. Rarer occurrences were also discovered in Brazil, India, Madagascar and Sri Lanka, but the yield of these mines can not be used.

History of Ametrine

Ametrine is relatively new on the gemstone market - since 1980.

Characteristics of Ametrine

The quartz variety Ametrine shows a rare polychromatic characteristic, the feminine purple of the amethyst gently runs into the fresh yellow of the citrine. This colour gradient takes place in a clear crystal body, this leaves an impressive show of colours as you can see from our Ametrine selection!

Ametrine varieties

Usually, the ametrine is two colors which are dispersed in equal parts and smoothly merge. However, with the kaleidoscope ametrine, the different colors of the ametrine are set with the special polish to create an optical color whirlpool - an impressive effect that gives the gem a special depth.






Ametrine (also Amethyst-Citrine Quartz, Trystine or Golden Amethyst) is a bicolour blend of Citrine and Amethyst. Its unusual colour is due to iron in different states of oxidation. While its main deposit in Bolivia has been famous since the 17th century, it's only become commercially available since 1980. Fine specimens traditionally display intense colours evenly split, but free-form 'fantasy' cuts that ignore a balanced contrast between the two colours, as well as concave cutting that creates a blend of colours in more traditional shapes (Sunburst Ametrine), are increasingly popular.

Care of the Ametrine

Although the ametrine may be subjected to a steam, but no ultrasonic cleaning.

To top